increasing the visibility of every kind of body.

( please submit your own photos: fat, thin, any race, anywhere on the gender spectrum, nude, clothed--
any type of body that needs some more visibility. you know who you are.)


*** the admins of this blog tend to reblog photos from other blogs a lot. if you notice we have reblogged your photo and you would prefer it not be on here, please let us know and we will delete it without hesitation. ***





vizzzibility Info   questions?   Archive   feel free to submit your own photos!   statement   // what do we mean by "visibility"?   Next›
2012–2014
Posted 1 year ago with 1661 notes
Posted 1 year ago with 1251 notes
ancestryinprogress:

mujer-encabronada:

dank-potion:

tyrawm:

★Drawn by Tyra WM
I got my new pen!! Thought I’d test it out~ Quick little doodle. I’m terrible at lines but I tried :) 
This is pretty much my response to a lot of people who have reblogged the woman with the afro I drew. There have been quite a lot of comments I’ve seen on my dash, some people felt ‘uncomfortable’ with the racial undertones, others posted ‘THIS WOULD BE ME IF I WAS SASSY BLACK WOMAN!’ and fruit basket assortment of stupidity basically. I don’t care for it honestly. But thats the price of posting something on the internet ♥ ~ 

Yo, so how relevant is this?

encabronadas por vida~*

And I will not apologize.
Posted 1 year ago with 3494 notes
a-myriad-of-marvels:

Love her Purple Fro
Posted 1 year ago with 219 notes
colorfulcuties:

♥
Posted 1 year ago with 951 notes
Posted 1 year ago with 1238 notes
genderpunk:

Hawtness
Posted 1 year ago with 3482 notes
colorfulcuties:

♥
Posted 1 year ago with 1693 notes
zebablah:

I’ve been contemplating going pink or purple. Hmm. 
Posted 1 year ago with 251 notes
napakaganda:

stellablu:

☀

TumbleOn)
Posted 1 year ago with 49856 notes
africanfashion:

For those of you who criticize Janelle’s signature monochromatic look.From her speech on “Black Girls Rock”:“When I started my music career, I was a maid. I used to clean houses. My mother was a proud janitor. My stepfather, who raised me like his very own, worked at the post office and my father was a trashman. They all wore uniforms and that’s why I stand here today, in my black and white, and I wear my uniform to honor them.This is a reminder that I have work to do. I have people to uplift. I have people to inspire. And today, I wear my uniform proudly as a Cover Girl. I want to be clear, young girls, I didn’t have to change who I was to become a Cover Girl. I didn’t have to become perfect because I’ve learned throughout my journey that perfection is the enemy of greatness.Embrace what makes you unique, even if it makes others uncomfortable.” - Janelle Monáe